Bad Roof Installation vs. Good Roof Installation

The roof plays different roles in the house like temperature regulations, protections against harsh elements, and even add beauty to your home. Roof installation should be taken seriously to avoid a botched job. That is why homeowners are encouraged to employ the services of a well-reviewed and rated roof instructor. Without any knowledge of roof installation, a homeowner may be unable to recognize a bad roof installation from a good installation. This article offers some of the key pointers you need to look out for for poor installation and good installation.

Spotting a bad roof installation

Fasteners

 During installation, the roofing contractor should calculate the number of nails to be used for every shingle installed. Most manufacturers indicate clearly the number of nails to be used per shingle, with most roofers opting to use at least four nails. Using fewer nails will leave the shingles vulnerable to winds. 

 Roofers also use fasteners and nails to secure sections of the roof like the gutter to prevent water from entering the house. However, some roofers rush over their jobs, failing to fasten the shingles and gutters properly, leading to a bad installation. 

Starter shingles

 Inexperienced roofers tend to forget to place starter shingles before beginning work on the roof. It is recommended for roofers to installer a starter strip under the first layer of shingles along the eaves. Starter strips provide extra protection to vulnerable sections of the roof, for example, eaves that can get damaged from ice build-up during the cold seasons. If your roof contractor skips this step, your roof is likely to face several leaks and even damage to the shingles.

Underlayment

 For people living in cold regions or in preparation for icy winters, it is wise to install a protective underlayment between the sheathing and shingles. Most roof contractors recommend a felt underlayment or an ice and water shield that helps to prevent the formation of ice dams that force water under the shingles. In certain regions, it is required by law to install two underlayments to prevent water damage to the roof and even the walls. 

 Above are just the common steps roofers tend to skip when installing roofs. As a homeowner, it is wise for you to be present or leave someone with knowledge of roofing to ensure all the necessary steps are being followed. This way, you can avoid having to spend an extra penny redoing the entire job. A good job done has several benefits and can put you to rest. To achieve this, you can consider the following factors before installation. 

Elements of good installation

Hire a trusted contractor

 Ask the right questions when hiring your roof contractor, this way, you will be able to gauge their professionalism. Research on the best contractor within your locality, and make sure to go over their previous works and reviews from reputable online sources. Your installation can only be good if you are working with the right team. 

Following the manufacturer’s instructions

 Most roofing materials come with instructions on the best way to install them for a long-lasting result. Most roofers overlook this, something that could cause trouble in the near future. Have your contractor go over the manufacturer’s instructions and follow them correctly. Following the laid down guideline could prevent future warranty claims and even give you the best installation. 

Replace old roof installation components and materials

 When doing a complete roofing job, it is wise to get rid of the entire installation, including accessories that were part of the old roof system. Replacing these accessories and components during reroofing is cost-effective rather than installing them in the near future. Some of the aspects you may want to handle include vents, skylights, and bad siding.

 Bad roofing could prove costly for you in the long run. It is advisable to take your time to get It right with a good installation to avoid incurring extra costs. With good installation, you do not have to worry about the safety of your household or property.